Volume III, Issue 9: June 2011
People

People

Zoo director and alumnus Yamaguchi shares fun anteater facts

Baby anteater clings on back of her mother
The Santa Ana Zoo's baby giant anteater, seen here at 1 week old, spends most of her time riding on her mom's back. 

When a bouncing baby anteater was born at the Santa Ana Zoo this spring, Kent Yamaguchi '83 and '84 was as happy and proud as a parent. The zoo director also happens to be a UCI alumnus who "bleeds Anteater blood," so he was thrilled when Peter — the zoo's giant anteater named after UCI's beloved mascot — became a father. Peter's progeny — a girl — has spent her first months clinging to her mother, Heesoo of Troy, and the right to name her is available to anyone who donates $5,000 to the zoo. To celebrate the newborn's arrival, Yamaguchi recently shared some fun anteater facts:

  • Peter's favorite food at the zoo is a smoothie of blended spinach, banana, papaya, hard-boiled egg and a commercial insectivore diet supplement. Yum!
  • In the wild, Peter would use his long, quick tongue to lap up 30,000 ants each day. His amazing tongue protrudes 24 inches.
  • The baby anteater is called a pup and rides on her mom's back for up to a year — or until mom says, "No more."
  • Peter and his mate love to swim and have their own custom anteater swimming pool.
  • Their long fan-like tail is folded over their curled bodies when they sleep. Peter sleeps up to 15 hours each day.
    

Avise elected to American Philosophical Society

John C. Avise
John C. Avise

John C. Avise, Distinguished Professor of ecology & evolutionary biology, has been elected to the American Philosophical Society, one of the world's most prestigious scholarly groups. Founded in 1745 by Benjamin Franklin, it promotes useful knowledge in the sciences and humanities and has slightly more than 1,000 members. "I feel deeply gratified and humbled by this recognition, which, in truth, mostly reflects the extraordinary efforts of my many students and colleagues across four decades," Avise said.

Avise elected to APS »


Uhlmann awarded Kleinman Prize

Gunther Uhlmann
Gunther Uhlmann

Gunther Uhlmann, Excellence in Teaching Chair in Mathematics, has won the 2011 Ralph E. Kleinman Prize by the Society for Industrial & Applied Mathematics. The honor is awarded biennially to an individual for outstanding research or other contributions that bridge the gap between mathematics and applications, particularly work that uses high-level mathematics and/or invents new mathematical tools to solve applied problems from engineering, science and technology. Uhlmann is being recognized for his "insightful and deep contributions to the theory of inverse problems." The award will be presented at the ICIAM meeting July 18-22 in Vancouver, British Columbia.

Kleinman prize »

Solinger wins Emeriti Association mentoring award

Dorothy Solinger
Dorothy Solinger

Dorothy Solinger, political science professor, has received the UCI Emeriti Association's 2011 Outstanding Mentoring Award. An expert on East Asian politics (especially China), Solinger is being recognized for her mentoring efforts above and beyond her regular faculty responsibilities, particularly her mentorship of junior faculty and graduate students at other institutions as well as her focus on gender equity and ethnic diversity.

Solinger honored »

In memoriam: Walter Monroe Fitch

Walter Monroe Fitch
Walter Monroe Fitch

Longtime UCI ecology & evolutionary biology professor Walter Monroe Fitch, founder of molecular phylogenetics, died March 10 in Irvine at age 81. "Walter was an intellectual giant," said Brandon Gaut, chair of the Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology. "He meant a great deal to countless people on our campus and beyond." At the time of his death, Fitch — who strongly supported the widespread teaching of evolution — was just finishing a book on the creationism-evolution controversy. He was honored by colleagues and friends at a May memorial at the Arnold & Mabel Beckman Center of the National Academies of Sciences & Engineering.

Fitch remembered »